Global Citizens

Stream Overview

How do we, and how should we, live together on this planet? How does globalization affect society? How do we communicate across national, cultural, or political divides? This stream invites students to examine the environments that surround them—local, global, social, and natural—and to think and act responsibly within and across those environments. Students will also have an opportunity to extend their coursework beyond the classroom with a community-engaged learning project.

 

In an increasingly interconnected world, what does it mean to imagine ourselves as members of a global community?
In "Global Citizens," we focus on the cultural, social, political, and environmental impacts of "globalization." Using scholarly perspectives from the disciplines of Geography, Political Science, Sociology, and English, we consider alternative ways of thinking about the world and the people in it. What are our responsibilities to one another, and to other forms of life?
Issues and themes associated with Global Citizenship include citizenship, migration, diaspora, political participation, social justice, climate and environmental issues, memory, trauma, and urban life.

“I chose the CAP Global Citizens Stream because it immersed me in a small yet diverse student group to collaborate and discuss a wide range of contemporary topics of global citizenship, while linking ideas between different discourses. The joint lectures with all CAP professors were particularly memorable and highlighted the interactive and collaborative nature of the CAP program. My year in CAP consolidated my decision to major in international relations, and I hope to later find a career in international humanitarian work.”

Lauren Shykora, intended major International Relations

Click here for more student testimonials.


Courses

Arts Studies, Sociology, Political Science, Geography.

All course descriptions and information are subject to change.

In your first term, you will enrol in Arts Studies, Sociology, and Political Science to learn how society and politics play a role in our global lives in issues of power, representation, and structure. You will be introduced to features and techniques of academic writing in your courses, and exhibit them in a research paper in your political science course.

Arts Studies (ASTU) 100 Seminar

(6 credits/2 terms) – First Year CAP Seminar: Focuses on writing and reading, including both literature and introduction to academic scholarship. This course provides an interdisciplinary foundation for academic writing and related research communicative practices within an interactive learning environment. Topics for each section vary by according to faculty.

Students will choose one out of four different sections (G01/G02/G03/G04), based on their scheduling needs and academic interests, and stay in the same section for both terms.

Timeslots:
G01: Mon, Wed & Fri 11:00-12:00
G02: Tues & Thurs  9:30-11:00
G03: Tues & Thurs 11:00-12:30
G04: Tues & Thurs 2:00-3:30


  • ASTU 100 Section G01: Narrating Refuge and Displacement

Instructor:  Dr. Erin Goheen Glanville
Email address: egoheeng@mail.ubc.ca

The crises of the 21st century have made clear how interconnected the globe is and have raised the issue of whether nations have responsibility for people beyond their borders. But people who survive without the protection and rights of citizenship have unique perspectives on what it means to be a citizen of the globe. Studying refugee narratives—sanctuary sought, offered, found, and refused—opens up a new angle from which to understand shared human responsibilities and vulnerabilities.

As an introduction to literary cultural studies, this course reads displacement literature to answer questions like, who writes refugee narratives and why? What is the use of stories for displaced communities? What roles has fiction played in narrating migration for reading publics?

We will study the genres, aesthetic techniques, and narrative forms used by refugee authors and learn from them about global relations. Sample texts: Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do (graphic memoir), Wayde Compton’s The Blue Road (fable), Lawrence Hill’s The Illegal (novel), Thomas King’s “Borders” (short story), Khaled Hosseini’s “Sea Prayer” (360 VR poem), Michael Fukushima’s Minoru (animation). A special feature of this course is experiential learning: virtual visits from refugee experts and a partnership with the City of Vancouver to explore sanctuary city policies.

This course also teaches academic writing skills. Students will learn and practice the conventions of knowledge-making in Arts disciplines, including how to write an article summary, critical analysis, literature review, research proposal, and paper.

Due to COVID19, this course will be taught remotely through a combination of synchronous events (live sessions once a week) and asynchronous activities (online modules that include: audio lectures, group annotations, online discussions, and reflective responses).


  • ASTU 100 Sections G02 & G03: Literature and/as Memory

Instructor: Dr. Moberley Luger
Email address: mluger@mail.ubc.ca

In this course, we will explore what it means to be a “global citizen” in the 21st century by looking at how literature represents our relations to one another. We will do this by focusing on a particular topic in literature: “memory.” This topic will prompt us to ask questions like these: How does literature function as a record of history? What obligations does literature have toward “truth” – and what kinds of truths does it convey or suppress? Who “owns” a story and who can tell a story? Should we only speak for ourselves, or must we also speak for others? The texts on our reading list will explore these questions through literature that remembers both local histories (e.g. residential schools in Canada) and global ones (e.g. 9/11 and the Iraq War). Here are some sample texts: Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis (comic), Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist (novella); Jordan Abel’s Injun (poetry); Richard Wagamese’s Indian Horse (novel); Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do (comic).

And, because this is a course that covers both literature and academic writing, we will not only practice our skills as readers—but also develop our skills as writers. Students will learn the conventions of knowledge-making and writing in Arts disciplines. This means you will join in the scholarly conversations you read and contribute new knowledge to them. To do this, you will produce a writing in the form of blogs, literature reviews, research essays, editorials, and/or conference papers.

 


  • ASTU 100 Sections G04: Narrating Refuge and Displacement

Instructor:  Dr. Erin Goheen Glanville
Email address: egoheeng@mail.ubc.ca

The crises of the 21st century have made clear how interconnected the globe is and have raised the issue of whether nations have responsibility for people beyond their borders. But people who survive without the protection and rights of citizenship have unique perspectives on what it means to be a citizen of the globe. Studying refugee narratives—sanctuary sought, offered, found, and refused—opens up a new angle from which to understand shared human responsibilities and vulnerabilities.

As an introduction to literary cultural studies, this course reads displacement literature to answer questions like, who writes refugee narratives and why? What is the use of stories for displaced communities? What roles has fiction played in narrating migration for reading publics?

We will study the genres, aesthetic techniques, and narrative forms used by refugee authors and learn from them about global relations. Sample texts: Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do (graphic memoir), Wayde Compton’s The Blue Road (fable), Lawrence Hill’s The Illegal (novel), Thomas King’s “Borders” (short story), Khaled Hosseini’s “Sea Prayer” (360 VR poem), Michael Fukushima’s Minoru (animation). A special feature of this course is experiential learning: virtual visits from refugee experts and a partnership with the City of Vancouver to explore sanctuary city policies.

This course also teaches academic writing skills. Students will learn and practice the conventions of knowledge-making in Arts disciplines, including how to write an article summary, critical analysis, literature review, research proposal, and paper.

Due to COVID19, this course will be taught remotely through a combination of synchronous events (live sessions once a week) and asynchronous activities (online modules that include: audio lectures, group annotations, online discussions, and reflective responses).

Sociology (SOCI) 100 - Introduction to Sociology

(6 credits/2 terms)
Instructor: Neil Armitage
Email address: neil.armitage@ubc.ca

How do we work together towards a more just, fair and sustainable society? A society in which health and happiness is a social right irrespective of class, gender, race, or age. Is there such a thing as a global society? A society in which you are able to participate irrespective of the circumstances you are born into. These types of questions have guided sociology since it’s foundations over a century ago and will guide your journey on Sociology 100 – Introduction to Sociology. The course will encourage you to start thinking sociologically on a range of issues, and see how they relate to your everyday life. The course challenges you to challenge your ideas and opinions, and provides you with the tools and the supports for you to succeed on your UBC journey.

The course consists of lectures in real time (synchronous), that will be recorded and posted on Canvas so that you may watch them in your own time (asynchronous). Each week you will engage with a mix of pedagogical activities such as readings, quizzes and online discussions in your own time, and attend a tutorial where you will meet and work with your peers in real time. Attendance of tutorials is important for you to build community and learn how to work together. As such, there are a range of tutorial times to accommodate students in different time-zones. If you are unable to attend tutorials due to internet or technical difficulties, alternate means to participate will be provided.

Political Science (POLI) 100 - Introduction to Politics

(3 credits/ 1 term)
Instructor: Joëlle Alice Michaud-Ouellet
Email address: ja.mo@ubc.ca

** Lectures will be held at the posted Vancouver times on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. They will be recorded and posted on Canvas to accommodate students located in a different time zone. Lectures may include pre-recorded material, and occasionally, a portion of lecture time may be replaced with asynchronous pedagogical activities such as peer reviews, reading exercises, and discussions on Canvas discussion boards. Tutorials will be held synchronously and scheduled at different times during the week to allow all students to participate.

Political Science 100 will introduce you to key concepts, ideas, and challenges of politics. The course is meant to provide you with the research and analytical skills necessary to pursue studies in political science at UBC and enhance your participation in the various communities of governance in which you are involved. The course consists of a combination of lectures, group discussions and readings. Each week, you will be required to attend three one-hour lectures and a one-hour tutorial session.

One recurring theme in the course is how relations of power and aspirations to freedom and justice influence the ways in which political communities are governed. The meaning of justice and freedom are not predetermined; these notions mean different things for different people and contexts, which leads to conflicts and struggles that involve recourse to power. Important subthemes in the course are legitimacy, sovereignty, ideology, and rights. A special attention will be given to the State as a pillar of modern politics. We will study its interactions with citizens and alternative political communities such as Indigenous communities, identity groups, social movements, and the global community.

In your second term, you will continue your studies in Arts Studies and Sociology, as well as be introduced to the lens of Geography, where you will learn more about our globalising and modernising world and how literature plays a part in both shaping and resisting the structures surrounding our world.

Arts Studies (ASTU) 100 Seminar

(6 credits/2 terms) – First Year CAP Seminar: Focuses on writing and reading, including both literature and introduction to academic scholarship. This course provides an interdisciplinary foundation for academic writing and related research communicative practices within an interactive learning environment. Topics for each section vary by according to faculty.

Students will choose one out of four different sections (G01/G02/G03/G04), based on their scheduling needs and academic interests, and stay in the same section for both terms.

Timeslots:
G01: Mon, Wed & Fri 11:00-12:00
G02: Tues & Thurs  9:30-11:00
G03: Tues & Thurs 11:00-12:30
G04: Tues & Thurs 2:00-3:00


  • ASTU 100 Section G01: Narrating Refuge and Displacement

Instructor:  Dr. Erin Goheen Glanville
Email address: egoheeng@mail.ubc.ca

The crises of the 21st century have made clear how interconnected the globe is and have raised the issue of whether nations have responsibility for people beyond their borders. But people who survive without the protection and rights of citizenship have unique perspectives on what it means to be a citizen of the globe. Studying refugee narratives—sanctuary sought, offered, found, and refused—opens up a new angle from which to understand shared human responsibilities and vulnerabilities.

As an introduction to literary cultural studies, this course reads displacement literature to answer questions like, who writes refugee narratives and why? What is the use of stories for displaced communities? What roles has fiction played in narrating migration for reading publics?

We will study the genres, aesthetic techniques, and narrative forms used by refugee authors and learn from them about global relations. Sample texts: Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do (graphic memoir), Wayde Compton’s The Blue Road (fable), Lawrence Hill’s The Illegal (novel), Thomas King’s “Borders” (short story), Khaled Hosseini’s “Sea Prayer” (360 VR poem), Michael Fukushima’s Minoru (animation). A special feature of this course is experiential learning: virtual visits from refugee experts and a partnership with the City of Vancouver to explore sanctuary city policies.

This course also teaches academic writing skills. Students will learn and practice the conventions of knowledge-making in Arts disciplines, including how to write an article summary, critical analysis, literature review, research proposal, and paper.

Due to COVID19, this course will be taught remotely through a combination of synchronous events (live sessions once a week) and asynchronous activities (online modules that include: audio lectures, group annotations, online discussions, and reflective responses).

 


  • ASTU 100 Sections G02 & G03: Literature and/as Memory

Instructor: Dr. Moberley Luger
Email address: mluger@mail.ubc.ca

In this course, we will explore what it means to be a “global citizen” in the 21st century by looking at how literature represents our relations to one another. We will do this by focusing on a particular topic in literature: “memory.” This topic will prompt us to ask questions like these: How does literature function as a record of history? What obligations does literature have toward “truth” – and what kinds of truths does it convey or suppress? Who “owns” a story and who can tell a story? Should we only speak for ourselves, or must we also speak for others? The texts on our reading list will explore these questions through literature that remembers both local histories (e.g. residential schools in Canada) and global ones (e.g. 9/11 and the Iraq War). Here are some sample texts: Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis (comic), Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist (novella); Jordan Abel’s Injun (poetry); Richard Wagamese’s Indian Horse (novel); Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do (comic).

And, because this is a course that covers both literature and academic writing, we will not only practice our skills as readers—but also develop our skills as writers. Students will learn the conventions of knowledge-making and writing in Arts disciplines. This means you will join in the scholarly conversations you read and contribute new knowledge to them. To do this, you will produce a writing in the form of blogs, literature reviews, research essays, editorials, and/or conference papers.

 


  • ASTU 100 Sections G04: Narrating Refuge and Displacement

Instructor:  Dr. Erin Goheen Glanville
Email address: egoheeng@mail.ubc.ca

The crises of the 21st century have made clear how interconnected the globe is and have raised the issue of whether nations have responsibility for people beyond their borders. But people who survive without the protection and rights of citizenship have unique perspectives on what it means to be a citizen of the globe. Studying refugee narratives—sanctuary sought, offered, found, and refused—opens up a new angle from which to understand shared human responsibilities and vulnerabilities.

As an introduction to literary cultural studies, this course reads displacement literature to answer questions like, who writes refugee narratives and why? What is the use of stories for displaced communities? What roles has fiction played in narrating migration for reading publics?

We will study the genres, aesthetic techniques, and narrative forms used by refugee authors and learn from them about global relations. Sample texts: Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do (graphic memoir), Wayde Compton’s The Blue Road (fable), Lawrence Hill’s The Illegal (novel), Thomas King’s “Borders” (short story), Khaled Hosseini’s “Sea Prayer” (360 VR poem), Michael Fukushima’s Minoru (animation). A special feature of this course is experiential learning: virtual visits from refugee experts and a partnership with the City of Vancouver to explore sanctuary city policies.

This course also teaches academic writing skills. Students will learn and practice the conventions of knowledge-making in Arts disciplines, including how to write an article summary, critical analysis, literature review, research proposal, and paper.

Due to COVID19, this course will be taught remotely through a combination of synchronous events (live sessions once a week) and asynchronous activities (online modules that include: audio lectures, group annotations, online discussions, and reflective responses).

 


Sociology (SOCI) 100 - Introduction to Sociology

(6 credits/2 terms)

Instructor: Neil Armitage
Email address: neil.armitage@ubc.ca

How do we work together towards a more just, fair and sustainable society? A society in which health and happiness is a social right irrespective of class, gender, race, or age. Is there such a thing as a global society? A society in which you are able to participate irrespective of the circumstances you are born into. These types of questions have guided sociology since it’s foundations over a century ago and will guide your journey on Sociology 100 – Introduction to Sociology. The course will encourage you to start thinking sociologically on a range of issues, and see how they relate to your everyday life. The course challenges you to challenge your ideas and opinions, and provides you with the tools and the supports for you to succeed on your UBC journey.

The course consists of lectures in real time (synchronous), that will be recorded and posted on Canvas so that you may watch them in your own time (asynchronous). Each week you will engage with a mix of pedagogical activities such as readings, quizzes and online discussions in your own time, and attend a tutorial where you will meet and work with your peers in real time. Attendance of tutorials is important for you to build community and learn how to work together. As such, there are a range of tutorial times to accommodate students in different time-zones. If you are unable to attend tutorials due to internet or technical difficulties, alternate means to participate will be provided.

Geography (GEOG) 122 - Geography, Modernity, and Globalisation

(3 credits/1 term)
Instructors: Dr. Jim Glassman & Dr. Priti Narayan
Email addresses: jim.glassman@geog.ubc.ca & priti.narayan@ubc.ca

Geography 122 is an introduction to human geography and to the history and present character of our globalising world. Overall, the course seeks to interpret geographically and historically globalisation, its consequences, regional expressions, and reactions against it. The course is divided into five main blocks, each one concerned with the history and human geography of a different substantive theme critical to shaping our present global world. The first is about the development of settler colonialism in North America as well as responses by Native peoples. The second is about the emergence of industrial capitalism from the 17th century in Western Europe to its transformation into a global economic system, which for the most part is now dominated by high-income countries of the Global North. The third is about the corresponding form of development in the Global South, countries with low incomes, which often historically experienced the malevolent effects of European colonialism, but recently have undergone rapid economic change. The fourth focuses on twentieth-century geopolitics, that is, international political relations, their motivations and consequences, among countries. The fifth is about the intersection of human geographies with nature and the physical environment, now one in which humans have fundamentally changed the material form and physical processes of the planet (we are in the epoch of the Anthropocene).

** If UBC continues to hold classes online in Term 2, lectures will be delivered asynchronously (pre-recorded). TA-led tutorials will include some synchronous (live) discussion.


Timetable

Please note that you will only register in one ASTU 100 seminar, and one SOCI 100 and POLI 100 discussion section. This timetable is subject to change.

 

Please note that you will only register in one ASTU 100 section, and one SOCI 100 and GEOG 122 discussion section. This timetable is subject to change.